Blog Entries in Category: General Blogs

Now Open: The 2014 Global Packaging Design Awards

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Category: General Blogs

We are now accepting entries for the 2014 Global Packaging Design Awards. The awards recognize the best in beverage packaging design from around the world. They are open to any packages introduced since Sept. 1, 2013. Deadline for entries is August 15th. Winners will be notified by Oct. 1st and will also be featured in the November 2014 edition of Beverage World. Contact packagingawards@beverageworld.com for details on how to enter.

New Products Tap Into America’s Spirits Market

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Category: General Blogs  |  Tags: spirits, liquor, cocktails, pisco, Wine & Spirits Whole

I found it interesting while walking the aisles of the Wine & Spirits Wholesalers of America (WSWA) show last month in Las Vegas just how many different types of beverages—even after all these years-—the average American consumer still has little or no knowledge of. There were numerous importers and distillers from other countries at this year’s show, here to publicize their national drinks to the American market. I covered this to some extent in my write-up about the show, which you can find beginning on page 10 of the May issue of Beverage World. But the space there didn’t really allow me to do justice to the passion these companies have behind their products. Two cases in point are Portón, which sells half of all Peruvian pisco exports to the U.S., and CNS Enterprises, the oldest and largest importer of China’s baijiu to the United States.
 
During the show I had the pleasure of spending time with one of the world’s foremost experts on pisco, Johnny Schuler. Having Schuler guide you through a personal tasting and exploration of the delights of this unique spirt is a special experience to say the least. It’s rare to meet someone more enamored of a particular beverage. He detailed for me how Portón is made at the 330-year-old distillery in Hacienda La Caravedo in Ica, Peru. That’s right, 330 years old, making it the oldest working distillery in the Americas, according to Schuler. “We consider Pisco to be the fifth white spirit,” he explained to me. “Gin, vodka, rum and tequila are the four big sisters. And we have the new one on the market called pisco. People have to understand that pisco is a category of its own. It’s not like tequila which is made from cactus. It’s not like vodka, made from grain. Pisco’s made from fruit, the grape. So it’s the only white spirit made from a fruit. And Peru has about 380 distilleries that make hundreds or even thousands of different varieties of piscos. So it’s a wonderful, huge, beautiful world, much like the world of cognac in France.”
 
And yet, ask many Americans about pisco today and they might give you a blank stare. This is especially curious because pisco at one point was enormously popular in some parts of the United States. In fact, if you were to jump in your time machine and travel back to mid-1800s San Francisco, you’d find Pisco Punches being served all over the city. Furthermore, it just so happens that the most popular cocktail in Peru today, the Pisco Sour, was actually created by an American in Peru in 1918—a Mormon, in fact—named Victor Morris. 
 
As for baijiu, the folks with CNS  enthusiastically explained to me how much this spirit is an integral part of Chinese culture (and also that of many other Asian countries). The custom is for guests in China to be greeted with a tiny measure—about half an ounce (it is over 100 proof)—of the spirit when they arrive and everyone begins drinking it before they sit down. (I believe I actually witnessed this custom amongst a group of Chinese at a Chinese restaurant in New York City right after WSWA, purely by coincidence. The baijiu kept the diners quite energized, and on their feet very often during the meal!) 
 
Baijiu is actually the top-selling spirit in the world; almost twice as much of it is consumed around the world as vodka. Now it’s heading here, too.

Don't Let Quality Be Blinded By Quantity

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Category: General Blogs

If there’s one theme that sticks in my head from last month’s Craft Brewers Conference (CBC) & BrewExpo America in Denver, it’s quality versus quantity. Or, more specifically, how much does the latter help or hurt the former?
 
The quality issue has been a running theme at the past handful of CBCs and has been a core talking point in Brewers Association director Paul Gatza’s annual State of the Craft Brewing Industry address. And it kind of has to be, especially when you’re bringing quantity into the equation. By quantity, I mean, of course, the exploding number of new breweries getting into the craft business year after year. Just last year the number of new craft operations surged by about 15 percent to 2,768 at the end of 2013.  

It’s exciting but it’s also somewhat frightening and that sentiment’s certainly not lost on the folks at the Brewers Association. It’s a segment whose key players have survived and thrived largely because of an uncompromising commitment to quality. The pioneers got in the business when there was no bandwagon on which to jump or wave to ride.

But now, as everyone from financial community to amateur brewing hobbyists are hip to the accelerating growth of craft, there could be many getting into the business without getting their heads around what’s truly involved. I’ve spoken to more than a few people who’s said, “I’m a pretty good home brewer and my friends said I should start a brewery. So I did.” And more than a few others among the moneyed classes who’ve said, “I hear craft brewing’s hot, so I’m going to invest in it even though I don’t know much about it or really care all that much about beer.”

I can somewhat relate with the first group. It wouldn’t be immodest of me to say that the dozen years I’ve been writing about beer (not to mention every other beverage) that I know slightly more than the average consumer about it.

But I could never claim to know as much or more about beer than actual brewers or authors who’ve had several books published on the topic—many of whom I count among my friends. The friends not involved in beer in anyway, however, think I know “everything” about the beverage because I know a few more things about it than they do. So I’ve had them tell me on more than one occasion, “Hey, you should start a brewery.” Umm, no. There are two types of insight my experience has afforded me. No. 1: Running a brewery is hard work.  No. 2: The more I learn about brewing the more I learn how little I know about brewing.

So it scares me when folks say they’d committed their every penny to a business based on nothing more than the urgings of less-knowledgeable friends.
   
Don’t get me wrong, I’m thrilled that there’s so much interest in craft beer and so many new players. I fell in love with craft beer my first year at Beverage World and the rise of the segment over the past decade-plus has paralleled my own personal beer geek adventure.

This is personal for me. I don’t want this surge in quantity to be at the expense of quality. Because it’s quality that really makes craft...well, craft.

In the Weeds

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Category: General Blogs

I have to be honest; I really hadn’t given marijuana or any form of pot legalization much thought before this year. I’ve more or less been indifferent on the whole movement, as I don’t really have any skin in that game, personally or professionally. It wasn’t until I attended Harry Schuhmacher’s Beer Industry Summit at the end of January that it started occupying any space in my brain because it seemed that a disproportionate number of attendees were talking about it—the stuff had just become legal in that big beer state of Colorado only a few weeks before. Some pondered whether it would be a competitive threat to the beer business.

The short answer, in my take-it-with-a-grain-of-salt opinion: of course not.

This isn’t 1933 when suddenly a substance that the public had, for 14 years, been clamoring to make legal again (and only became illegal in the first place because savvy, manipulative advocacy groups that didn’t represent the majority of the U.S. population wanted it that way) was once again legit. The three-tier system was born. The beverage alcohol supply chain was defined for generations. And, technological advances, consolidation and SKU proliferation nothwithstanding, it’s still pretty much the same system it was 80 years ago.  

The logistics and infrastructure of pot are a lot more, well, foggy (pun intended). Also, for those avid beer drinkers who also partake of the wacky weed on the down-low, it’s hardly ever been an either/or proposition when it comes to bongs versus brews. And, if you’ve spent as much time hanging around brewers as I have, you’ll know many of them are pretty flexible when it comes to their philosophies on pot.

Then there’s the obvious fact that consumers enjoy beer, especially craft beer, for its flavor and refreshment, not primarily for its intoxicating effects. Few talk about the subtle notes of citrus and chocolate when toking on a joint.

That’s not to say there aren’t some dangers inherent in the legalization debate. Schuhmacher, of Beer Business Daily fame, pointed out that a major talking point among weed advocates is that it’s safer than alcohol. Rhetoric like that is something folks in the beverage alcohol business really don’t need in their lives. All that it does is provide fodder for neo-Prohibitionist organizations (Alcohol Justice comes to mind), allowing them to just sit back and watch the alcohol industry and marijuana advocates destroy each other. Sort of a passive “divide and conquer.”

In my view the beverage alcohol industry should really just stay out of the pot debate and focus on the things it does best—product innovation, logistical excellence and corporate citizenship. Let it play out organically. If it does become a legal reality nationwide, there’ll be room enough for everyone. There may even be cross-merchandising opportunities. After all, a cold, refreshing beer comes in handy when a munchies-stricken consumer needs something to help wash down that impulsively purchased tube of Pringles.

I’m joking, of course. Stay away from the pot, kids

A Tale of Two Pepsis

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Category: General Blogs  |  Tags: soft drink

So we are supposed to believe that suddenly the entire world is shunning a refreshing Pepsi or Coke because they have a lot of calories, but can’t wait to get their hands on a Subway sandwich filled with Fritos, or an indulgent new nachos you can gobble up on the go from Taco Bell?

Which is it, because, at least in my mind, the two trends seem to be telling me two things at once—and this is driving me slowly crazy!

Are we really seeing consumers the world over suddenly turn against carbonated soft drinks, or is there something else going on here?

Activist investor Nelson Peltz believes it’s the latter. He would like to see PepsiCo split into two parts: one for its food business, the other for its beverages. And he wants this not because he thinks the beverage part of the business would then slither away into a corner and die like some zombie from “The Walking Dead,” but because he believes it would then be able to thrive under a more “focused leadership.”

I’m inclined to agree with him. And this is despite the synergies “The Power of One” — where PepsiCo’s food and beverages have been used together in some powerful promotions—have brought to PepsiCo. The reason is that in this day and age—“The Age of Creative Disruption”—it’s not hard to see why more intense focus can only benefit a beverage business.

I’m writing this, after all, in the days following the announcement that Comcast plans to buy out Time Warner. And the news just broke that Netlfix is paying Comcast to ensure its pipeline into homes remains free of disruption by the increasingly powerful Comcast. And NBC just noticed how a vast number of its audience turned to their iPads, mobile phone and computers, instead of their TV’s, to watch the Olympics live. And I can go on and on...

Talk about creative disruption!  

Our industry’s “creative disruption” can be seen in the interest in the handcrafted and the local over the distant and impersonal. It’s in the craft beer renaissance, where small brewers are giving entrenched global brands a run for their money. Case in point: I recently dined out at a newly opened gastropub in my Queens, N.Y. neighborhood and was able to savor the pub’s new house beer, brewed by the nearby, and newly opened, Queens Brewery. You can’t get much more local than that.

And that’s just beer. We haven’t even touched on the increasing number of new functional beverages—everything from beautifying drinks, to drinks that help you think better, sleep better, or stay alert longer. Or how about the premiumization of just about everything? Think Starbucks’ experimentation with handcrafted sodas.

So it may be that the pickle CSD finds itself in today isn’t so much about consumers running away from high-calorie sodas (as the mainstream media loves to so dramatically describe it) as it is about them just enjoying all the new choices they have.

Beverage companies that can focus 100 percent on navigating their way through all the new opportunities created by this creative disruption probably have a big advantage going forward.