Lowering the Bar

So, a man walks into a bar. He wants to order a pint of fine craft beer so he motions to the bartender. The bartender walks past him, not making eye contact. A few minutes pass and he continues to motion the bartender. Again, no acknowledgment whatsoever. After a few more minutes pass, he finally gets the bartender’s attention. She shoots him a “What do you want?” look and he shouts his order above the noise in the crowded pub. She shouts back, “I can’t hear you,” and walks away. Waiting for the punchline? There isn’t one. This, sadly, is no joke. This sort of thing happens more often than it should. The man in the tale is yours truly. It happened last month.

Look, I get that it was crowded and crowds and noise can be overwhelming. But that’s no excuse for poor customer service. In less-crowded situations I’ve sat at the bar and managed to engage the barkeep a little more easily. This time I wasn’t entirely sure what I wanted to order so I asked for a little insight on one of the many artisanal brews on tap.

Me: What style is it?

Bartender: It’s like Bass.

Me: But it says it has an ABV of 9 percent. That’s a bit high for that style.

Bartender: Well, it’s the same color.

This pub prided itself on its vast selection of craft beers on draught. But it seems that management was more concerned with quantity over quality—the quantity of its taps versus the quality of a trained, informed serving staff.

We seem to hold wait staff in restaurants to much higher standards of human interaction than we do bar staff. What’s the reason for that? There isn’t one, at least there shouldn’t be one. Bartenders are salespeople, just as waiters and waitresses are. They’re there to get you to buy stuff and answer any questions you may have about that stuff so you can make a more informed purchasing decision. I’m not saying that these bars are the rule—but they’re not the exception either. They’re somewhere in the middle of the exception-rule continuum.

And that costs sales, regardless of how negligible that loss would be in the grand scheme of things. It’s certainly not something that the companies that own the brands and the wholesalers that distribute the brands the bar is supposed to be selling take lightly.  

The staff and the owners could argue, “Well, the place is packed, so we’re obviously doing something right. So back off!” But why would anyone ever want to take customer traffic for granted? Exactly how loyal are the customers that happen to be packing that bar on a given night? Maybe they just pushed their way into that particular place because all the other establishments in the neighborhood were even more crowded. And if the managers and staff are giving them no reason to come back, they won’t.

Here’s another thing to consider: social media. If someone has a bad experience in a pub, that place can expect an instantaneous, unflattering tweet or a rather damning review on Yelp.  

The joke may begin with the man (or woman) walking into a bar. But no one’s laughing when the woman (or man) walks out of the bar a few seconds later…and never comes back. 

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