Farm to Bottle

Craft brewers across the country have been known for their embrace of all things local and that dynamic has manifest itself further in New York City with the launch of Brooklyn Brewery’s Greenmarket Wheat. The brew, inspired by the Belgian wit style, is the result of Brooklyn’s collaboration with non-profit environmental group GrowNYC, which, among other activities, helps build community gardens and runs New York City’s best-known greenmarket in Union Square. The effort involved working closely with New York State farmers and malters.

The collaboration is result of New York Gov. Mario Cuomo’s 2012 Farm Brewery License legislation aimed at expanding the growth of craft breweries and increasing demand for locally grown products to brew beer across the state.

Greenmarket Wheat, which is brewed from 70 percent New York State-grown wheat and barley and packaged in a 750 ml cork-finished bottle, will be available on Wednesdays and Saturdays at the Union Square Greenmarket and at Riverpark, chef Tom Colicchio’s restaurant where the beer was first poured during an unveiling event Wednesday afternoon. There are also plans to sell it at Whole Foods locations and other restaurants in the city interested in serving Greenmarket Wheat.

During Wednesday’s launch event, Brooklyn Brewery co-founder and president Steve Hindy described the path to making Greenmarket Wheat a reality.

“There is a demand for local produce, locally produced products and locally grown commodities and foods, but seven years ago you couldn’t get the grain to make this beer,” Hindy said. “Things have changed in the meantime thanks to the work of GrowNYC and the wonderful greenmarkets. [The markets are] such an incredible addition to the community in New York. There are people I see on Saturdays at my greenmarket whom I don’t otherwise run into. It’s not just a great place to buy your vegetables and your greens and everything else, it’s a great place to run into friends and it really creates a sense of community…The greenmarkets bring the bounty of New York to New York City and with this beer we’re supporting farmers upstate who are growing grain and providing a market for them.”

Hindy credits famed graphic artist Milton Glaser, who designed Brooklyn Brewery’s logo, as well as the iconic “I Love NY” logo, with bringing the brewery and GrowNYC together on the project. Glaser is a regular at the city’s greenmarkets and was also on hand at the unveiling.

“I’ve seen the city change so much in my time and one of the great changes in the city in terms of quality of life is the curious intersection of brewing and farming,” Glaser said. “Saturday morning is the time that my wife Shirley and I go out to start our day by going to the greenmarket…It’s a fabulous way to start our day and has so much improved the quality of civic credibility and comfort…I appreciate both the opportunity to continue to work for the Brooklyn Brewery and the greenmarket because of the common purpose of making feel good about being here and affectionate towards one another.”

Greenmarket Wheat uses raw wheat from North Country Farm in Watertown, N.Y., wildflower honey from Tremblay Apiaries in Chemung County, N.Y. and pilsner barley malt from Valley Malt in nearby Hadley, Mass. Malting only recently returned to the region.

“Throughout history there have been maltsters in any community where people grew grains and people drank beer,” noted Valley Malt owner Andrea Stanley. “And recently has that disconnect gone farther and farther away from where many of us live. And so in 2010 when we wanted to start using local grains in our home brewed beer, we found out that the closest malt house was in Wisconsin and we needed to grow a railroad car worth of grain if they were going to malt it for us. We decided that maybe we would step forward and maybe reconnect this part of our local food system.”

Right now, Brooklyn Brewery’s Hindy said, supplies of Greenmarket Wheat are only limited by the availability of local ingredients. “Really the only thing that’s going to prevent us from selling a lot of the beer is ensuring that we can get enough grain to brew it,” he said.

Brooklyn Brewery vice president and brew master Garrett Oliver says he hopes to be able to eventually boost the already high percentage of local ingredients used.

“We’ll keep the label saying 70 percent,” Oliver said, “but I’d like to be able to get to 80 percent, 90 percent and eventually 100 percent New York State-grown ingredients.”    

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