Category: General Blogs | Tags:

Saving Time in a Bottle

 

As I write this, in the middle of November, it seems that time itself is weighing heavily in the air. There is a strong feeling of nostalgia over the 50-year anniversary of the Kennedy assassination. The Congress just overhauled its filibuster rules for the first time in a generation. And (as editor-in-chief Jeff Cioletti so richly detailed in our last issue) the beverage alcohol industry in the U.S. reflected this year on the 80th anniversary of the Repeal of Prohibition—its meanings and its lessons.

And then, of course, there’s the issue you hold in your hand. As you see, it contains our HIT List, our annual roundup of the (mostly) winning things that happened in the beverage business in the past year.

Al of this, as you could imagine, had me thinking about “time” itself and the special relationship the beverage profession has with it. For the beverage business is one of the oldest ones in existence. If anyone asks you what you do for a living, you could say, “Well, I work in one of the oldest professions,” and have them give you a funny look.

This is especially true of the beer business. The Washington Post began this year—on Jan. 7, to be exact—by publishing an article which suggests that beer may have been the crucible of civilization! Ok, I may be exaggerating a little, but not by much. The article, entitled “Discovery of ancient breweries offers clues of primitive lifestyle,” details the recent discoveries of ancient brewing and feasting halls dating back 11,000 years (in Turkey) and 3,500 years (in Cyprus). It then cites archeologists who suggest the social lubricating effect of ancient beer may have served as the glue that helped rival villages bond and merge into larger communities.

So what’s different about the beer business today and the one that helped give rise to civilization thousands of years ago? I’d bet you its pace, as in, one was pretty darn slow, while the other is scatter-brained fast! And this doesn’t just hold for the beer business, but the entire beverage business.

It all makes me wonder: have we reached a point where our sense of time is so compressed that we are hurting our companies’ chances of success?

Case in point, I attended a trade show recently where I was chatting with the owner of a new beverage startup and asked him how old his company was. He told me two years and I matter-of-factly said, “Oh, so you’re pretty new.” His point-blank reply:  “Not really.” It struck me that his sense of time was different than mine. As an entrepreneur doing business in America today, he considered himself a tried-and-true veteran after just a couple of years in business.

Maybe he’s right? My gut was that he’s not. I still think it takes years and years of hard-work to really build the support structures that result in a successful beverage business, one that lasts and isn’t fly-by-night. It takes time to cement strong, deep relationships with consumers, distributors, and retailers. We may live in a fast-paced world, but relationships take time to build.

Or, am I just stuck in the past? 

Share this Article: