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In the Weeds

I have to be honest; I really hadn’t given marijuana or any form of pot legalization much thought before this year. I’ve more or less been indifferent on the whole movement, as I don’t really have any skin in that game, personally or professionally. It wasn’t until I attended Harry Schuhmacher’s Beer Industry Summit at the end of January that it started occupying any space in my brain because it seemed that a disproportionate number of attendees were talking about it—the stuff had just become legal in that big beer state of Colorado only a few weeks before. Some pondered whether it would be a competitive threat to the beer business.

The short answer, in my take-it-with-a-grain-of-salt opinion: of course not.

This isn’t 1933 when suddenly a substance that the public had, for 14 years, been clamoring to make legal again (and only became illegal in the first place because savvy, manipulative advocacy groups that didn’t represent the majority of the U.S. population wanted it that way) was once again legit. The three-tier system was born. The beverage alcohol supply chain was defined for generations. And, technological advances, consolidation and SKU proliferation nothwithstanding, it’s still pretty much the same system it was 80 years ago.  

The logistics and infrastructure of pot are a lot more, well, foggy (pun intended). Also, for those avid beer drinkers who also partake of the wacky weed on the down-low, it’s hardly ever been an either/or proposition when it comes to bongs versus brews. And, if you’ve spent as much time hanging around brewers as I have, you’ll know many of them are pretty flexible when it comes to their philosophies on pot.

Then there’s the obvious fact that consumers enjoy beer, especially craft beer, for its flavor and refreshment, not primarily for its intoxicating effects. Few talk about the subtle notes of citrus and chocolate when toking on a joint.

That’s not to say there aren’t some dangers inherent in the legalization debate. Schuhmacher, of Beer Business Daily fame, pointed out that a major talking point among weed advocates is that it’s safer than alcohol. Rhetoric like that is something folks in the beverage alcohol business really don’t need in their lives. All that it does is provide fodder for neo-Prohibitionist organizations (Alcohol Justice comes to mind), allowing them to just sit back and watch the alcohol industry and marijuana advocates destroy each other. Sort of a passive “divide and conquer.”

In my view the beverage alcohol industry should really just stay out of the pot debate and focus on the things it does best—product innovation, logistical excellence and corporate citizenship. Let it play out organically. If it does become a legal reality nationwide, there’ll be room enough for everyone. There may even be cross-merchandising opportunities. After all, a cold, refreshing beer comes in handy when a munchies-stricken consumer needs something to help wash down that impulsively purchased tube of Pringles.

I’m joking, of course. Stay away from the pot, kids

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